Our Baseball Presidents, Part 2

Nixon likely had the best fan connection to the sport. Avidly aware of the game, and documented his stuff. Meanwhile George H.W. Bush likely had the best skills, though Dwight Eisenhower, Bill Clinton and Harry Truman were very proficient. (Eisenhower a high school player, and self-proclaimed semi-pro.) John Thorn again writes up a gem.

Our Game

Teddy Roosevelt's Lifetime Pass, 1907 Teddy Roosevelt’s Lifetime Pass, 1907

Let’s resume our racehorse run through America’s baseball Presidents. When last we left our heroes, William McKinley had just promised to throw out the first pitch at the Washington home opener in April 1897 (http://goo.gl/ogDGrb). Although more than a hundred Senators and Congressmen showed up, and the club constructed a Presidential box complete with bunting, the honoree did not appear. Six months into his second term, an assassin’s bullet and ensuing medical malpractice brought us a new man in the White House: Theodore Roosevelt, who advocated a strenuous life and vigorous sport but detested baseball. His sons Kermit and Quentin played baseball but their exploits elicited little interest from Dad. Daughter Alice Roosevelt Longworth said, “Father and all of us regarded baseball as a mollycoddle game. Tennis, football, lacrosse, boxing, polo, yes: they are violent, which appealed to us. But baseball? Father wouldn’t even…

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